GEOTHERMAL

GEOTHERMAL


Geothermal energy—the heat of the Earth—is a clean, renewable resource that provides energy in the U.S. and around the world. The U.S. has been using commercial, large-scale geothermal power plants at deep resource temperatures (between 200˚F and 700˚F) since the 1960s.

Geothermal heat is used directly, without a power plant or a heat pump, for applications such as residential and commercial space heating and cooling, food preparation, hot spring bathing and spas (balneology), agriculture, aquaculture, greenhouses, snowmelting, and industrial processes. Geothermal direct uses are applied at aquifer temperatures between 90˚F and 200˚F.

Examples of direct use applications exist all across the U.S. Idaho’s Capitol Building in Boise uses geothermal for direct heating and cooling. President Franklin D. Roosevelt frequented Georgia’s healing hot springs and founded the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for polio treatment in 1927. Additionally, the City of Klamath Falls, Oregon began piping hot spring water to homes as early as 1900.

To learn more about the promise and potential of geothermal energy, please visit the Geothermal Energy Association’s website.